JCVI: Salmon genome in final phases of completion
 
 
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Collaborator Release 23-Nov-2011

COLLABORATOR PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Salmon genome in final phases of completion

November 23, 2011 —The International Cooperation to Sequence the Atlantic Salmon Genome (ICSASG, the "Cooperation") has awarded the Phase II contract for next-generation sequencing and analysis of the Atlantic salmon genome to the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) in Rockville, Maryland. The JCVI will be sequencing the salmon genome using next-generation technologies, including assembly to integrate Sanger and next-generation sequence, and comparative genomics. This effort is expected to generate a high-quality resource for those responsible for the management of wild salmon stocks and the salmon aquaculture industry, as well as providing a reference genome for work with other salmonids.

The Cooperation was formed in 2009 as a partnership between the Research Council of Norway, the Norwegian Fishery and Aquaculture Industry Research Fund, Genome British Columbia, and the Chilean Economic Development Agency (CORFO) and its Innovation Agency InnovaChile. The group brings together expert biologists who have studied salmonids with commercial and government agencies interested in funding further study. Salmonids play a key commercial and environmental role; while some salmon genetic information is known, many fundamental questions remain.

"A fully annotated salmon genome will provide important information about the impact of cultured fish escapees on wild populations, about preservation of populations that are at risk, about strategies for fighting pathogens, and about environmental sustainability issues," says ICSASG chair Dr. Steinar Bergseth at the Research Council of Norway. "A fully assembled reference sequence available for researchers worldwide will have a major impact on research into salmon and other salmonids, such as rainbow trout."

"This is a good example showing that science allows nations and institutions to cooperate on a field where they usually are competitors" says CEO Gonzalo J. Herrera of CONICYT.

"The salmon genome is large and contains repetitive sequences which make it a more difficult genome sequence to assemble. Working with ICSASG, we will complement the Phase I data with next-generation sequence data to provide the most complete salmon genome possible," says Jason Miller, an associate professor at JCVI.

Worldwide, commercial salmon production exceeds one billion pounds annually, with about 70% coming from aquaculture salmon farms. In addition to being an important economic resource, salmon and other salmonidae species such as trout are considered "sentinel species" for monitoring water quality, and are important markers for ecotoxicology studies.

"This project is a novel approach to addressing issues that are of economic and social importance to aquaculture, conservation, and the environment," says Dr. Alan Winter, President & CEO of Genome BC.

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The Research Council of Norway is Norway's official body for the development and implementation of national research strategy. The council is responsible for enhancing Norway's knowledge base and for promoting basic and applied research and innovation in order to help meet research needs within Norway and to encourage international research and cooperation. Funding for this project includes contributions from four private Norwegian companies.

The Norwegian Fishery and Aquaculture Research Fund (FHF) is the Norwegian seafood industry's research fund, aimed at creating value for the industry through identifying, financing and executing research and development projects. FHF is wholly financed by the Norwegian Seafood industry.

The Chilean Economic Development Agency (CORFO) is an autonomous agency of the Chilean State with legal capacity and equity. The agency is responsible for promoting the economic development of Chile, competitiveness and investment for production modernization.

InnovaChile Committee is a committee of the Chilean Economic Development Agency. This Committee works to raise the competitiveness of the Chilean economy by increasing the number of companies in Chile which integrate innovation in their competitive strategies.

About Genome British Columbia

Genome British Columbia is a catalyst for the life sciences cluster on Canada's West Coast, and manages a cumulative portfolio of over $550M in research projects and technology platforms. Working with governments, academia and industry across sectors such as forestry, fisheries, agriculture, environment, bioenergy, mining and human health, the goal of the organization is to generate social and economic benefits for British Columbia and Canada. www.genomebc.ca

About the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI)

The JCVI is a not-for-profit research institute in Rockville, MD and San Diego, CA dedicated to the advancement of the science of genomics; the understanding of its implications for society; and communication of those results to the scientific community, the public, and policymakers. Founded by J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., the JCVI is home to approximately 300 scientists and staff with expertise in human and evolutionary biology, genetics, bioinformatics/informatics, information technology, high-throughput DNA sequencing, genomic and environmental policy research, and public education in science. The JCVI is a 501 (c)(3) organization. For additional information, please visit www.JCVI.org.

Media Contact

Jennifer Boon
Communications Specialist, Genome BC
Phone: 778-327-8374
Email: jboon(AT)genomebc.ca