JCVI: A Comprehensive Collection of Systems Biology Data Characterizing the Host Response to Viral Infection.
 
 
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Citation

Aevermann BD, Pickett BE, Kumar S, Klem EB, Agnihothram S, Askovich PS, Bankhead A, Bolles M, Carter V, Chang J, Clauss TR, Dash P, Diercks AH, Eisfeld AJ, Ellis A, Fan S, Ferris MT, Gralinski LE, Green RR, Gritsenko MA, Hatta M, Heegel RA, Jacobs JM, Jeng S, Josset L, Kaiser SM, Kelly S, Law GL, Li C, Li J, Long C, Luna ML, Matzke M, McDermott J, Menachery V, Metz TO, Mitchell H, Monroe ME, Navarro G, Neumann G, Podyminogin RL, Purvine SO, Rosenberger CM, Sanders CJ, Schepmoes AA, Shukla AK, Sims A, Sova P, Tam VC, Tchitchek N, Thomas PG, Tilton SC, Totura A, Wang J, Webb-Robertson BJ, Wen J, Weiss JM, Yang F, Yount B, Zhang Q, McWeeney S, Smith RD, Waters KM, Kawaoka Y, Baric R, Aderem A, Katze MG, Scheuermann RH

A Comprehensive Collection of Systems Biology Data Characterizing the Host Response to Viral Infection.

Scientific Data. 2014 Nov 01; 1: 140033.

External Citation

Abstract

The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.