Rainbow Around The Son Book Chronicles a Mother’s Love and the Mutant p53 Gene

25-Oct-2018
Collaborator Release

Rainbow Around The Son Book Chronicles a Mother’s Love and the Mutant p53 Gene

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New Bestseller Reveals How One Family Discovered They Carried the Gene with over 90% Chance of Developing Cancer

Rainbow Around The Son, a new book by Marlo Gottfurcht Longstreet, is a memoir of her journey after her 11-year-old son Tanner is diagnosed with a Glioblastoma. The book, which is available in paperback and eBook format, became a bestseller on Amazon.

Marlo Gottfurcht Longstreet’s world was turned upside down when her son was diagnosed with a brain tumor. That, it turned out was just the beginning. In her raw, emotional memoir, she describes the experience from a loving mother’s point of view.

Tanner, along with his sister Casey, turned out to have the hereditary mutant p53 gene, which can lead to many types of cancers. This put Casey at a 90% risk for developing some form of cancer. While grieving the death of her son, Ms. Longstreet made it her mission to keep her daughter Casey healthy, as well as helping to prevent cancer in others via early testing detection. Ms. Longstreet and her father founded The Tanner Project, at the J. Craig Venter Institute in La Jolla, California. It develops personalized protocols that monitor patients who are predisposed to cancer. 

“When I started down this path, I wrote my book to help me get through the unimaginable. Yet, as I completed my book, I realized it wasn’t just for me… but also for you. If my book can make you think or question or wonder or learn or understand or believe or grow… if it can help anyone, in any way possible, then I feel like I did my job,” stated Ms. Longstreet.

Rainbow Around The Son is available in eBook [$5.99] and Print [$15.99] at bookstores. It is for sale online at numerous retailers including Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HWZQ9HL/

About

Marlo Gottfurcht Longstreet is the founder and president of the Tanner Project Foundation, which is in memory of her 11-year-old son, Tanner, who died of Glioblastoma in 2013. Tanner was also diagnosed with the mutant p53 gene, a hereditary cancer gene, which can lead to many types of cancers. 

The Foundation has funded several research projects for very early detection of cancer at the moment disease begins. The Tanner Project, at the J. Craig Venter Institute in La Jolla, California, develops personalized protocols that monitor patients who are predisposed to cancer. 

For more information visit http://www.tannerproject.org

Media Contact

Marlo Gottfurcht Longstreet, The Tanner Project